Version control Using Git as a tool to version control documentation gives us complete transparency and control over content updates. When developing documentation as code, we generally store our document as a Git repository. Git tracks every update made to content within a repository via commits. We can tag the document at a specific time manually to version it, or rely on Git flows to analyze document changes. This approach is scalable to even when we have dozens of collaborators working on the same content across a decentralized team. We can apply permissions to what user can update what branch, and whether a gatekeeper needs to approve a change. Workflows to update tags manually should be defined by your company's specific documentation workflows and included or referenced in the *README.md* file of your document. Below is an example using a document lifecycle tool (GitLab in this case) to show us our document tags.
1 minute read | Concept

Version control

Using Git as a tool to version control documentation gives us complete transparency and control over content updates.

When developing documentation as code, we generally store our document as a Git repository.

Git tracks every update made to content within a repository via commits. We can tag the document at a specific time manually to version it, or rely on Git flows to analyze document changes.

This approach is scalable to even when we have dozens of collaborators working on the same content across a decentralized team. We can apply permissions to what user can update what branch, and whether a gatekeeper needs to approve a change.

Workflows to update tags manually should be defined by your company’s specific documentation workflows and included or referenced in the README.md file of your document.

Below is an example using a document lifecycle tool (GitLab in this case) to show us our document tags.

Example

See also

Home | Contact | Examples